Friday, May 25, 2012

Care & Cleaning of GrillGrates

 Cleaning GrillGrates is a bit counter intuitive as less is more especially in the beginning. During the first few uses avoid the temptation to over clean them or take them indoors to the sink. Just shut down the grill and enjoy your grate meal. Clean them as little as possible during the first several uses to allow seasoning to take place. GrillGrates will season quickly like a cast iron skillet. (without the rust and regular re-seasoning)
Tip: Use grill spray (Weber or Pam) or Canola Oil the first few uses while the rails are un- seasoned. (Focus on the raised cooking rails- no need to wipe or spray the valleys.) We don't want you to stick that first grate burger or fish filet. After a few grillings (especially chicken) grill spray will become unnecessary.
Well seasoned GrillGrates 
Over time GrillGrates will become nearly self-cleaning as built-up debris and carbonized juices burn off or release and brush away. 
Routine Maintenance:  Routine care is primarily brushing or wiping the raised cooking rails clean during the warm up of your grill.  Its better to clean GrillGrates during warm-up rather than at the end of the cook with hot GrillGrates.
  • Use either a grill pad or a basic grill brush. I like the grill pads because they wear out and force you to replace them regularly.
  • The popular triangular brush works well to reach into the valleys.
  • Steaming grill brushes also work well to steam clean hot GrillGrates. I find I don't use it as often because it tends to dry out the GrillGrates. Go easy on the water. Be careful of hot steam- spritz of water during warmup is best. Do not use a garden hose on hot GrillGrates- it is guaranteed to warp them.
This is my go to brush to get into the valleys.
Tip: Replace your brush regularly- just like your tooth brush they wear out or get too dirty

When GrillGrates Get Sloppy and They Will! 
Here are a Few Tricks to Clean Them Right Up:
  1. The GrateTool doubles as a cleaning device for the valleys. Use it like a shovel or a plow. The tines are turned upward at the tip so they won't catch in the holes of the valleys. Periodically shovel the valleys with the GrateTool either during warm up or on a cold grill. Shovel the valleys after particularly greasy foods such as chicken or a grill full of 80/20 hamburgers. The grease will puddle in the valleys and is easily shoveled away the next grilling with the GrateTool. A little grease is fabulous flavor, but too much grease in the valleys can ignite or send burned offerings up to your food.
Hot SOAK in JOY and a little Brillo 

I only clean the valleys on my GrillGrates when there is a reasonable buildup. Most of the time the build-up dislodges during brushing and the GrillGrates truly do become self cleaning.  Its only when I get sloppy with marinades or grill a lot of chicken or hamburgers that I tend to the valleys. 

 2.  SOAK GrillGrates in HOT water with Dawn or Joy dish-soapFocus on the raised rails with a scruby and use the GrateTool as a scrapper for the valleys and sides in the sink too.

grease gone, cleaning GrillGrates
Grease Gone
    • TIP: Its OK to use Brillo on the top of the rails but don't go crazy trying to clean the valleys or bottom. 
    • We are testing an organic de-greaser that is showing very good results.  Grease Gone is a coconut oil based all natural product that can also be used as a hand-cleaner, range top cleaner and added to hot water for a GrillGrate cleaner.  Includes a sanding block style sponge that is for the valleys. (Update July 10th- currently out of stock on Grease Gone- not sure if we are continuing to sell)
    3.  Burning OFF on the grill is OK-  but GrillGrates will dry out from the prolonged heat You may need to use Grill Spray or canola oil on the cooking rails the first cook or two. 
    • TIP: Several customers report success cleaning GrillGrates in their self-cleaning ovens. Do not use oven cleaner as it can pit and tarnish. They may be 'dry' the first couple of cooks.
    • Powerwash! Customers also report power-washing is very effective. One catering customer told me he bungee-cords his GrillGrates to a tree and power washes them after rendering pork butts on them!
    Do you have a special process or brush you particularly like- please tell us!



    Updated May 21 2013.  One year to the day...

    1 comment:

    Stephen Klug said...

    My advice is to choose a stainless steel grill brush with bristles thin enough not to cause damage. The usual belief that you can only use brass bristled grill brushes for porcelain enamel coated grates is not in fact true. Many stainless steel grill Brushes are perfectly safe to use…